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Chicken Florentine Casserole

Chicken Florentine Casserole

Chicken Florentine Casserole

Category: Main Dishes

Yield: 2 Servings

Tip: Cooked brown rice can be refrigerated for up to 4 days as long as you cool it quickly and store it in a shallow sealed container. Make a big batch at the beginning of the week to use for speedy salads, side dishes and casseroles.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup sliced button mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup shredded carrot
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlice
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan
  • pinch ground nutmeg
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cooked, skinless, boneless chicken breast, shredded
  • 2 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 cups packed fresh spinach

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Farenheit
  2. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Saute the onion, mushrooms, carrot, and garlic until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in flour until it looks pasty, about 1 minute. Stir in the milk and continue stirring until the sauce thickens, about 4 minutes. Add the cheese and nutmeg. Season with pepper.
  3. Put the chicken, rice, and spinach in a large bowl, pour the sauce over, and mix well with a large spoon.
  4. Spoon the chicken mixture into an 8 x 8 cassarole dish. Bake until bubbly and lightly browned, about 15 minutes.

Notes

Today's recipe is shared from Healthy Cookbook for Two by Rockridge Press

http://chiroaddict.com/chicken-florentine-casserole/

Almond Coconut Granola Bars

Almond Coconut Granola Bars

Almond Coconut Granola Bars

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chopped almonds
  • 1 ¾ cups quick-cooking oats (or old-fashioned oats, pulsed briefly in a food processor or blender to break them up)
  • 1 cup large, unsweetened coconut flakes (shredded coconut should work, too)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup creamy almond butter or peanut butter
  • ½ cup honey or maple syrup
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Line a 9-inch square baker with two strips of criss-crossed parchment paper, cut to fit neatly against the base and up the sides. The parchment paper will make it easy for you to slice the bars later.
  2. Toast the almonds for maximum flavor (you can skip this step, but your bars won’t be quite as awesome): In a medium skillet over medium heat, toast the almonds, stirring frequently, until they are fragrant and starting to turn lightly golden on the edges, about 5 minutes. Transfer them to a medium mixing bowl.
  3. To the mixing bowl, add the oats, coconut flakes, cinnamon and salt. Stir until blended.
  4. In a 2-cup liquid measuring cup, measure out 1 cup almond butter. Top with ½ cup honey, followed by the vanilla extract. Whisk until well blended. (If you must, you can gently warm the liquid mixture in the microwave or on the stovetop.)
  5. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. Use a big spoon to mix them together until the two are evenly combined and no dry oats remain. The drier the mixture, the more firm the bars will be, so stir in extra oats if the mixture seems wet. Conversely, if you used a super thick almond butter (cough, Justin’s), you might need to drizzle in another tablespoon of honey to help it all stick together.
  6. Transfer the mixture to the prepared square baker. Use your spoon to arrange the mixture fairly evenly in the baker, then use the bottom of a flat, round surface (like a short, sturdy drinking glass) to pack the mixture down as firmly and evenly as possible. (If the mixture keeps sticking to the glass, cover the base of the glass with a small square of parchment paper.)
  7. Cover the baker and refrigerate for at least one hour, or overnight. This gives the oats time to absorb moisture so the granola bars can set.
  8. When you’re ready to slice, lift the bars out of the baker by grabbing both pieces of parchment paper on opposite corners. Use a sharp chef’s knife to slice the mixture into 4 even rows and 4 even columns (these “bars” stick together better in a square shape).
  9. For portability, you can wrap individual bars in plastic wrap or parchment paper. Bars keep well for a couple of days at room temperature, but I recommend storing individually wrapped bars in a freezer-safe bag in the freezer for best flavor. They’ll keep for several months in the freezer.

Notes

Today's recipe was shared from the following website: https://cookieandkate.com/2016/almond-coconut-granola-bars/

http://chiroaddict.com/almond-coconut-granola-bars/

Herb Rice

Herb Rice

Herb Rice

Category: Rice and Grains

Today's recipe is shared from The New Natural Healing Cookbook by Bessie Jo Tillman, M.D.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup uncooked brown rice (or 3/4 cup brown rice and 1/4 cup wild rice)
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 1/2 cups boiling water
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parley (or 1 teaspoon dried parsley)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sweet basil
  • 1/2 teaspoon tarragon
  • freshly ground pepper to tasted

Instructions

  1. Rinse brown rice and drain well. Heat oil in a pot (or electric skillet) and stir-coo brown rice and garlic over medium-high heat until rice looks transparent. Carefully stir in boiling water and seasonings. Lower heat, cover, and simmer for 40 minutes. Remove the lid to allow the steam to escape. After a few minutes, stir lightly with a fork to separate the grains.
http://chiroaddict.com/herb-rice/

Sesame Chicken Meatballs

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 2 Servings

Calories per serving: 419

Fat per serving: 12.4 g

Saturated fat per serving: 3.2 g

Sesame Chicken Meatballs

Ingredients

  • 10 ounces lean ground chicken
  • 1 teaspoon seasoned whole-wheat bread crumbs
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 teaspoon low-sodium tamari sauce
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 2 whole wheat pitas, halved
  • 1/2 cup shredded cucumber, with the liquid squeezed out
  • 2 Tablespoons sour cream
  • 1/2 scallion, white and green parts, cut diagonally into 1/8 inch thick slices

Instructions

  1. 1. In large bowl, thoroughly mix the chicken, bread crumbs, sesame seeds, egg white, and tamarind and season with pepper. Form the chicken mixture into eight meatballs.
  2. 2. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook the meatballs until they are cooked through and browned on all sides, about 8 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. 3. Stuff each pita half with two meatballs. Tops the meatballs with the shredded cucumber, sour cream and scallion.

Notes

This recipe could also be made with ground pork or turkey instead of the chicken.

http://chiroaddict.com/1803-2/

Almond-Honey Power Bar

Almond-Honey Power Bar

Almond-Honey Power Bar

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Category: Snacks

Almond-Honey Power Bar

Ingredients

  • 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
  • ¼ cup slivered almonds
  • ¼ cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 tablespoon flaxseeds, preferably golden
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1 cup unsweetened whole-grain puffed cereal
  • ⅓ cup currants
  • ⅓ cup chopped dried apricots
  • ⅓ cup chopped golden raisin
  • s¼ cup creamy almond butter
  • ¼ cup turbinado sugar
  • ¼ cup honey
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat an 8-inch-square pan with cooking spray. Spread oats, almonds, sunflower seeds, flaxseeds and sesame seeds on a large, rimmed baking sheet. Bake until the oats are lightly toasted and the nuts are fragrant, shaking the pan halfway through, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Add cereal, currants, apricots and raisins; toss to combine. Combine almond butter, sugar, honey, vanilla and salt in a small saucepan. Heat over medium-low, stirring frequently, until the mixture bubbles lightly, 2 to 5 minutes. Immediately pour the almond butter mixture over the dry ingredients and mix with a spoon or spatula until no dry spots remain. Transfer to the prepared pan. Lightly coat your hands with cooking spray and press the mixture down firmly to make an even layer (wait until the mixture cools slightly if necessary). Refrigerate until firm, about 30 minutes; cut into 8 bars.

Notes

Make Ahead Tip: Store in an airtight container at room temperature or in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or freeze for up to 1 month; thaw at room temperature.

Ingredient notes: For this recipe, we like unsweetened puffed multi-grain cereal, such as Kashi's 7 Whole Grain Puffs. Almond butter can be found at natural-foods stores and large supermarkets, near the peanut butter. Turbinado sugar is steam-cleaned raw cane sugar. It's coarse-grained and light brown in color, with a slight molasses flavor. Find it in the natural-foods section of large supermarkets or at natural-foods stores.

Cut Down on Dishes: A rimmed baking sheet is great for everything from roasting to catching accidental drips and spills. For effortless cleanup and to keep your baking sheets in tip-top shape, line them with a layer of foil before each use.

Storage smarts: For long-term freezer storage, wrap your food in a layer of plastic wrap followed by a layer of foil. The plastic will help prevent freezer burn while the foil will help keep off-odors from seeping into the food.

Today's recipe was shared from the following website: http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/253052/almond-honey-power-bar/

http://chiroaddict.com/almond-honey-power-bar/

Crock Pot Madras Lentils

Crock Pot Madras Lentils

This is such a fun recipe discovery! We got a sample of this dish at Costco…it is a yummy substitute for mild chili (you could spice it up) and a fun convenience food the way it is sold at Costco but here’s an easy recipe for a quick, inexpensive and delish go to meal for a busy night!

Crock Pot Madras Lentils

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 4 hours

Total Time: 4 hours, 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb dried lentils
  • 1 4 oz can diced green chilis
  • 1 15 oz can small red kidney beans
  • 1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
  • 1 medium onion, minced
  • 6 cups beef or vegetable broth
  • 1 TBSP chili powder
  • 1 TBSP cumin
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients EXCEPT HEAVY CREAM in slow cooker and stir to combine.
  2. Cover and cook on LOW 4 to 5 hours.
  3. Stir in heavy cream.
  4. Using an immersion blender (or a blender or food processor in batches), puree until to desired thickness.
  5. Salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Serve alone or over rice, and top with cheese and/or sour cream.
  7. Recipe is shared from the following website: http://funnyisfamily.com/2017/02/crock-pot-madras-lentils.html
http://chiroaddict.com/crock-pot-madras-lentils/

Top Foods for a Healthy Nervous System

Top Foods for a Healthy Nervous System

The health of your nervous system is vital for maintaining all your body’s functions and avoiding a range of potentially serious health problems. But if you’re not getting a sufficient amount of the nutrients needed for good nervous system health, you can experience such as numbness, nervous twitches or even muscle cramps. Fortunately, one of the easiest things you can do to help ensure a healthy nervous system is to eat the right kinds of foods.

Here’s a quick overview of several nutrients that play a key role in keeping your nervous system healthy and working the way it should.

Vitamin B1 (thiamin)

A deficiency of this vitamin can give you that pins-and-needles sensation in the toes or burning feet, especially at night. Good foods for vitamin B1 are beef liver, seafood, brewer’s yeast, beans, eggs and sunflower seeds.

Vitamin B6

Nerve cell communication suffers without this vitamin. Two key neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, depend on vitamin B6 for their production. Bananas, potatoes, and chick peas are good sources.

Vitamin B12

A shortage of this vitamin can result in tingling and numbness in the hands and feet. Clams, fish, eggs, meat and dairy products are key sources of vitamin B12.

Copper

Like vitamin B6, this mineral is essential for the production of neurotransmitters. A severe lack of copper in your diet can lead to spinal cord degeneration and a progressive failure of nerve function. Liver and oysters are the best sources. Add prunes, spinach and kale (as well as other dark, leafy green vegetables), and nuts to your diet for even more copper.

Healthy foods for good nervous system function include the following:

Spinach—In addition to containing a powerhouse stock of nutrients and vitamins, this leafy green vegetable also contains an abundance of antioxidants to boost overall health and slow down the aging of the brain and nervous system.

Whole grains—Brown rice in particular contains high levels of vitamin B6, which helps to protect against mental deterioration caused by high levels of harmful homocysteines. Whole grains also include magnesium, which is important for the health of your nervous system. Stabilized rice bran contains one of the highest levels of antioxidants of all known foods.

Cocoa—This contains a powerful antioxidant that puts the brakes on oxidative stress that can lead to Alzheimer’s and similar neurological ailments. It is also high in magnesium.

Whey—An excellent food for a naturally calming effect. Rich in L-tryptophan, which the body cannot produce, this essential amino acid is vital in the production of serotonin, an essential neurotransmitter. Low levels of serotonin can lead to depression.

Garlic—This not only includes antioxidants, but garlic can help prevent aging of the brain and prevent infections, too.

So try working more of the above foods into your weekly menus, and feel pleased that you are doing something good for the health of your nervous system!

If feel that you need help with improving your eating habits and diet, we are just a phone call away! You can call at Oblander Chiropractic at 406-652-3553. Dr. Oblander is always willing to meet with you to discuss your nutritional needs!

 

Top 5 Ways to Improve Your Digestion

Top 5 Ways to Improve Your Digestion

A well-functioning digestive system is crucial to maintaining your body’s overall health. Without it, you are likely to have bowel problems and suffer from digestive upsets, not to mention a host of other conditions that can result from not getting enough nutrients from the food you eat. The digestive system affects all the other systems of the body, so it’s important to do what you can to be sure it’s working the way it should. Following are the top 5 things you can do to help improve your digestion.

Eat more fiber – Soluble and insoluble fiber are both essential for moving food through the digestive tract. Soluble fiber, such as that found in oatmeal, beans, nuts and apples, turns to a gel in your intestines and slows digestion, helping to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It absorbs water, softening the stool, and promotes the health of the good bacteria in your gut. Insoluble fiber, such as that found in the skins of fruit and vegetables, speeds digestion, adds bulk and passes primarily intact through the digestive tract. Both are important in preventing constipation and can improve conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Drink more fluids – Insufficient water intake can harden the stool, increasing constipation. You should be sure to drink at least 1.2 liters of fluid per day, which is about 6 glasses. Some people need more, based on their activity level and the ambient temperature. However, do not drink more than about 6 ounces of liquid during a meal (taking the occasional sip), as it can dilute your stomach acid, making digestion more difficult. Aim to get most of your fluid intake 15-30 minutes before a meal or at least an hour afterward.

Take probiotics – Probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria are the good bacteria that populate our digestive tract. Eating yogurt with a variety of helpful live cultures as well as fermented foods like sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir can help promote the production and health of these beneficial bacteria.

Eat more fat – Although increasing your fiber intake can improve your digestion that fiber does not move through the digestive tract so easily if you are not getting enough fat in your diet. Good fats will not raise your cholesterol and in fact are a healthy part of your diet when eaten in moderation. Some healthy sources of fat are olive oil, coconut oil, butter and avocados.

Reduce stress – When you are under stress, your digestive system slows down and circulation to the digestive tract is reduced, lowering your body’s ability to efficiently break down and utilize the food you eat. Do not rush through meals, and be sure to sufficiently chew and savor your food when you eat. If you must eat while under stress, be sure you eat foods that are simple to digest, such as broth or yogurt.

6 Reasons to Stop Buying Microwave Popcorn

6 Reasons to Stop Buying Microwave Popcorn

6 Reasons to Stop Buying Microwave Popcorn

Ah, popcorn. A movie staple, a campfire favorite, even a Christmas decoration. We’re big fans of the stuff here at our house. The way we enjoy it, though, is the semi-old fashioned way: we make ours with the air popper (the truly old-fashioned way is in a skillet, over a fire, just in case you were wondering).  Back in our pre-microwave days in the 1980s, my mom always made popcorn with the air popper. She’d salt it a little and mix in some melted butter. Mmmmm…

Then the microwave relegated the air popper to the back of the cupboards, taking up space alongside the other hardly used appliances. It just seemed so much more convenient to just pop the bag in the microwave. Sure, sometimes a good portion of the bag’s contents were either charred or completely unpopped, but that was the trade-off for a pre-seasoned and effortless bag of popcorn. That’s the way it was for us, at least.

For Christmas in 2008, my parents gave us an air popper (we’re still using the same one) and some fun serving containers. We stopped buying the microwave stuff and have only used our air popper ever since. Though this is our preferred way to pop, there are other methods, like cooking it on the stovetop or microwaving popcorn kernels in a brown paper bag. Each way works well and is better than the stuff sold pre-packaged at the store.  Here are six reasons why you should take the boxes of microwave popcorn off your shopping list…

1. Homemade popcorn is frugal.
Hence the mention on here, right?  There is no denying that buying the popcorn kernels is much cheaper, especially if you can find it in the bulk food bins at the grocery store (most common in health/natural food stores).  With microwave popcorn, you’re paying for the bags, the brand, the oils and seasonings, and plastic packaging. For the same price of a few bags of microwave popcorn, you could get pounds of the kernels. It only takes a half cup of kernels in our air popper to yield a big bowl of popcorn. A pound of popcorn goes a long way. Even if you buy the popper (which run around $15-25), it’s still the more frugal way to enjoy popcorn. Just by skipping microwave popcorn and getting the kernels in bulk, the popper soon pays for itself in savings.

2. Homemade popcorn is less wasteful.
Whenever I make popcorn, there’s maybe two or three kernels left unpopped, maximum. And I’ve never had burned popcorn making it with the air popper. All those burnt/unpopped kernels at the bottom of the microwave is waste. Unless you’ve gotten microwaving popcorn down to a science or the popcorn setting on your microwave actually works, waste is practically inevitable.

3. Microwave popcorn takes as long to pop as homemade.
To prove this, I timed how long it took to pop half a cup of kernels (which equals a big bowl of popcorn). Barely over two minutes (plus the 30 or so seconds it took to get the popper out of the pantry, get a bowl out of the cupboard, and plug it in). That’s just about as long as it takes to do the microwave stuff. I can’t say how long it takes to do it the other ways I mentioned — on the stovetop or in the paper bag — but I’m willing to bet it’s pretty close. So, really, what are you paying for with microwave popcorn? Is it really that much more convenient?

4.  Microwave popcorn is unhealthy. Like, really unhealthy.
I recently read an article entitled, “7 Seven Foods That Should Never Cross Your Lips” and microwave popcorn is on the list. Here’s why, quoting the article:

“Chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the bag, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans, according to a recent study from UCLA. In animal testing, the chemicals cause liver, testicular, and pancreatic cancer. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to vaporize—and migrate into your popcorn. ‘They stay in your body for years and accumulate there,’ says Dr. Naidenko, which is why researchers worry that levels in humans could approach the amounts causing cancers in laboratory animals. DuPont and other manufacturers have promised to phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then.”

Yuck.

5. Cheap entertainment.
My older son has been entertained by the popcorn popper since the first time we used it, back when was barely two years old. Even now as a big five-year-old, he still likes watching the kernels spin and then pop like crazy. It’s a great way to dispell a grouchy mood. Even though the baby doesn’t eat popcorn yet (choking hazard and all), he giggles and squeals as we make it.  Homemade popcorn is also better for crafts like popcorn chains (can you imagine stringing greasy microwave popcorn?).

6. Homemade popcorn tastes better.
Microwave popcorn in “butter flavor” doesn’t come close to popcorn with real butter. It just doesn’t. It might take you a little adjustment at first if you’re used to the intensely flavored and super-salty stuff, but once you’re used to the wholesome taste of popcorn seasoned with some salt and real butter, you’ll think the microwave stuff is gross. Plus, there are other options for seasoning air popped popcorn: cocoa popcorn (my son literally licked the bowl clean), basil popcorn (yum), toffee popcorn (this recipe looks amazing), and more. The best part about homemade popcorn is that you control what goes (and doesn’t go) in it. You can make it as healthy or as decadent as you want.

All this is making me hungry. I’m going to go make some now. So should you.

Today’s article was written by Heather and shared from the following website: http://theparsimoniousprincess.blogspot.com/2012/01/6-reasons-to-stop-buying-microwave.html
Here’s a Great Recipe to Warm Us All Up!

Here’s a Great Recipe to Warm Us All Up!

CINNAMON VANILLA RICE PUDDING

CINNAMON VANILLA RICE PUDDING

Ingredients

  • 1/2 to 1 tsp. SweetLeaf® Liquid Stevia Cinnamon Sweet Drops™ or other stevia product
  • 1 cup brown basmati rice
  • 4-1/2 cups 1% milk
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon, ground

Instructions

  1. In a large saucepan, bring rice, milk, and salt to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Turn heat off, keep covered and allow to sit for 10 more minutes. Mix in the rest of the ingredients and stir well. Taste and adjust SweetLeaf® Liquid Stevia Cinnamon Sweet Drops™ if needed. Transfer pudding to 6 ramekins or glasses. Press plastic wrap onto the surface of each pudding to prevent it from forming a skin. Refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to 3 days before serving. Serve with whipped cream and a sprinkle of cinnamon.
  2. Traditional rice pudding is often made with white arborio rice, milk and sugar. In this healthier version, brown basmati rice is used instead and makes this pudding just as creamy, but more nutritious than its traditional counterpart. This recipe is easily adaptable to make dairy free by substituting the dairy milk for unsweetened almond milk or even coconut milk.
http://chiroaddict.com/heres-great-recipe-warm-us/

Today’s Rice Pudding Recipe was shared from the following website: https://sweetleaf.com/stevia-recipes/sugar-free-cinnamon-vanilla-rice-pudding/

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