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Chiropractic Patients Less Likely to Suffer Drug Reactions

Chiropractic Patients Less Likely to Suffer Drug Reactions

 

Most people experience back pain, and many of these patients use drugs for pain relief. A 2014 study1 found that of older adults with chronic back pain, 72% of them were using some kind of analgesic to help cope with the pain. Another study2 found that 32% of back pain patients in their analysis were using prescribed opiates for relief.

It’s unfortunate that so many patients depend on drugs for musculoskeletal aches and pains, especially when chiropractic is an effective and safe way to not only relieve pain, but also prevent future pain episodes.

Now a new study3 shows that chiropractic also is linked to a lower risk of adverse drug reactions in patients with back pain. In this study, the authors looked at the medical records of over 19,000 adults in New Hampshire who had at least two doctor visits for back pain. 9.810 of these patients used chiropractic care; 9,343 patients used regular medical care. The researchers analyzed the number of adverse drug effects (ADEs) experienced by the two groups.

The authors found:

  • Younger patients were more likely to use chiropractic care.
  • Non-chiropractic patients tended to have more health problems, in general, when compared to those who used chiropractic.
  • Chiropractic patients experienced 51% fewer adverse drug reactions (.4% vs .9%) compared to medical patients.
  • 15 non-chiropractic patients were diagnosed with drug withdrawal, while zero chiropractic patients had drug withdrawal.

This study had some limitations, as the study data didn’t included details about the types of drugs the patients were using or how frequently they were using medications. But the authors conclude that the “utilization of chiropractic care may be associated with reduced risk of ADEs; however, no causal relationship has been established.”

Another study by the same group of researchers found that chiropractic patients were 55% less likely to be prescribed opiates for their pain and had lower health care bills.

With the opiate epidemic in the US, it’s critical that we find non-opiate approaches to back pain treatment. Chiropractic is about restoring health without the use of drugs. By helping the body heal naturally, chiropractic can help you stay well and help you avoid unnecessary adverse drug reactions, too!

  1. Enthoven WT, Scheele J, Bierma-Zeinstra SM, Bueving HJ, Bohnen AM, Peul WC, van Tulder MW, Berger MY, Koes BW, Luijsterburg PA. Analgesic use in older adults with back pain: the BACE study. Pain Medicine 2014 Oct;15(10):1704-14. Doi: 10.1111/pme.12515.
  2. Ashworth J, Green DJ, Dunn KM, Jordan KP. Opioid use among low back pain patients in primary care: Is opioid prescription associated with disability at 6-month follow-up? Pain. 2013 Jul;154(7):1038-44. doi: 10.1016/j.pain.2013.03.011.
  3. Whedon JM, Toler AWJ, Goehl JM, Kazal LA. Association Between Utilization of Chiropractic Services for Treatment of Low Back Pain and Risk of Adverse Drug Events. Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics 2018 May 26. pii: S0161-4754(17)30136-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2018.01.004.
Honey Chocolate Bundt Cake

Honey Chocolate Bundt Cake

Honey Chocolate Bundt Cake

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Category: Desserts

Yield: 10 - 12 Servings

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • ⅔ cup oil
  • 1 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • pinch salt
  • ½ cup Dutch Process Cocoa Powder
  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 cup milk or parve milk

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease and flour a bundt pan and set aside.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat together eggs, sugar, oil, honey, vanilla, baking powder, baking soda and salt until creamy.
  3. Add cocoa, half the flour, half the milk, then the remaining flour and milk. Beat until just combined.
  4. Pour batter into prepared baking pan. Bake for about 45 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  5. Cool completely before adding glaze (see below), if using.

Notes

http://chiroaddict.com/honey-chocolate-bundt-cake/

Chicken Florentine Casserole

Chicken Florentine Casserole

Chicken Florentine Casserole

Category: Main Dishes

Yield: 2 Servings

Tip: Cooked brown rice can be refrigerated for up to 4 days as long as you cool it quickly and store it in a shallow sealed container. Make a big batch at the beginning of the week to use for speedy salads, side dishes and casseroles.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup sliced button mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup shredded carrot
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlice
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan
  • pinch ground nutmeg
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cooked, skinless, boneless chicken breast, shredded
  • 2 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 cups packed fresh spinach

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Farenheit
  2. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Saute the onion, mushrooms, carrot, and garlic until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in flour until it looks pasty, about 1 minute. Stir in the milk and continue stirring until the sauce thickens, about 4 minutes. Add the cheese and nutmeg. Season with pepper.
  3. Put the chicken, rice, and spinach in a large bowl, pour the sauce over, and mix well with a large spoon.
  4. Spoon the chicken mixture into an 8 x 8 cassarole dish. Bake until bubbly and lightly browned, about 15 minutes.

Notes

Today's recipe is shared from Healthy Cookbook for Two by Rockridge Press

http://chiroaddict.com/chicken-florentine-casserole/

Are You Sedentary?

Are You Sedentary?

Did you know that you need to walk at least 7000 steps a day? If you walk less than 7000 steps a day, you are considered sedentary! Today, we are sharing a video from www.primalplay.com. It helps to quickly show the results of living a sedentary lifestyle. Primal Play is a great website to check out if you want to incorporate more movement into your day in a fun and easy way! Have a wonderful “Moving” day!

Almond Coconut Granola Bars

Almond Coconut Granola Bars

Almond Coconut Granola Bars

Ingredients

  • 1 cup chopped almonds
  • 1 ¾ cups quick-cooking oats (or old-fashioned oats, pulsed briefly in a food processor or blender to break them up)
  • 1 cup large, unsweetened coconut flakes (shredded coconut should work, too)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup creamy almond butter or peanut butter
  • ½ cup honey or maple syrup
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Line a 9-inch square baker with two strips of criss-crossed parchment paper, cut to fit neatly against the base and up the sides. The parchment paper will make it easy for you to slice the bars later.
  2. Toast the almonds for maximum flavor (you can skip this step, but your bars won’t be quite as awesome): In a medium skillet over medium heat, toast the almonds, stirring frequently, until they are fragrant and starting to turn lightly golden on the edges, about 5 minutes. Transfer them to a medium mixing bowl.
  3. To the mixing bowl, add the oats, coconut flakes, cinnamon and salt. Stir until blended.
  4. In a 2-cup liquid measuring cup, measure out 1 cup almond butter. Top with ½ cup honey, followed by the vanilla extract. Whisk until well blended. (If you must, you can gently warm the liquid mixture in the microwave or on the stovetop.)
  5. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients. Use a big spoon to mix them together until the two are evenly combined and no dry oats remain. The drier the mixture, the more firm the bars will be, so stir in extra oats if the mixture seems wet. Conversely, if you used a super thick almond butter (cough, Justin’s), you might need to drizzle in another tablespoon of honey to help it all stick together.
  6. Transfer the mixture to the prepared square baker. Use your spoon to arrange the mixture fairly evenly in the baker, then use the bottom of a flat, round surface (like a short, sturdy drinking glass) to pack the mixture down as firmly and evenly as possible. (If the mixture keeps sticking to the glass, cover the base of the glass with a small square of parchment paper.)
  7. Cover the baker and refrigerate for at least one hour, or overnight. This gives the oats time to absorb moisture so the granola bars can set.
  8. When you’re ready to slice, lift the bars out of the baker by grabbing both pieces of parchment paper on opposite corners. Use a sharp chef’s knife to slice the mixture into 4 even rows and 4 even columns (these “bars” stick together better in a square shape).
  9. For portability, you can wrap individual bars in plastic wrap or parchment paper. Bars keep well for a couple of days at room temperature, but I recommend storing individually wrapped bars in a freezer-safe bag in the freezer for best flavor. They’ll keep for several months in the freezer.

Notes

Today's recipe was shared from the following website: https://cookieandkate.com/2016/almond-coconut-granola-bars/

http://chiroaddict.com/almond-coconut-granola-bars/

The Human Longevity Project – Such Good Information and So Much Beneficial Information!

The Human Longevity Project – Such Good Information and So Much Beneficial Information!

This is not a short video but it has such important information! We hope all of you will take the time out of your busy lives to watch it! We will continue to share this series of videos as it is released. The information shared here is vitally important to understand for positive physical and mental health!

Turkey Chow Mein

Turkey Chow Mein

Turkey Chow Mein

Ingredients

  • Seasonings:
  • 3 tablespoons Bragg Liquid Aminos
  • 3/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1/2 pound ground turkey
  • 3 green onions, sliced (white part only)
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 thin slices ginger root ( or 1/4 teaspoon ginger powder)
  • 1 carrot, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 medium-sized head of cabbage, chopped
  • 3 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 pound mung bean sprouts (or other variety)
  • green onion tops to garnish

Instructions

  1. Whisk together the seasoning ingredients (Liquid aminos through the sesame oil); set aside. Prepare the vegetables.
  2. In a heated wok or skillet, stir-cook the turkey until it turns white. Add the green and yellow onions and stir-cook for 1 minute. Add ginger root, carrots, cabbage, and celery, stir-cooking a little after each addition. When vegetables are crisp-tender, add seasoning and bean sprouts; stir-cook for 1 minute. Garnish with chopped green onion tops and serve over brown rice.

Notes

This recipe is shared from The New Natural Healing Cookbook by Bessie Jo Tillman, M.D.

http://chiroaddict.com/1845-2/

Does Having Young Children Really Build Your Immune System?

Does Having Young Children Really Build Your Immune System?

Maybe it’s just wishful thinking, but many moms and dads believe that having a young child or two around the house boosts their immune system.  It’s easy to see why this idea has some popular appeal.  After all, young children typically have lots of contact with other young children, often in environments where lots of germs can be spread. They then bring these same germs home, where parents’ immune systems need to fight them off over a sustained period of time. The thinking goes that this, in turn, helps make parents more resistant to them.

But what does the science actually say about this? Although there is at least one strong study and a lot of related or anecdotal evidence that suggests that the idea may be sound, more research needs to be done to see if this theory is valid.

The “strong study” is from Norway, and was published in the journal Science & Medicine. It’s important to note that the study did not specifically evaluate the immune response of parents and non-parents. Rather, this particular research was aimed at understanding the relationship between parenthood and overall health. The investigators looked into detailed medical records of more than 1.5 million men and women born between 1935 and 1968, and found that there was a strong negative correlation between being a parent and the risk of developing cancer, heart disease, becoming an alcoholic, and even dying in a car crash. The study found that the people most at risk of dying from any of these causes were those who were childless. The researchers theorized that this may be because the individuals felt less of a need to take care of their health.

Fascinatingly, the study also found that the positive health benefits or parenthood seemed to depend on the numberof children. Having only one child or having more than three children actually slightly increased the risk of dying from any of these factors, whereas having two children was “just right.” As researcher Emily Grundy of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, says: “Four-plus children might have adverse effects arising from stress, socio-economic disadvantages and lifestyles, off-setting, or even outweighing, social benefits of parenthood.”

In terms of other evidence, the strongest suggestions that having children might strengthen their parent’s immune system come from related studies that have consistently shown that having pets in the home strengthens and builds the children’s immune systems and helps to keep them healthy. For example, a 2012 study from the journal Pediatricsshowed that children who lived with dogs and cats during the first year of life tended to be significantly healthier than those who did not. The researchers theorized that the pets exposed children to a wide variety of “good germs,” some of which are beneficial for developing immunity to the “bad germs.” We may be able to infer that parents might also benefit from being exposed to a variety of germs, both from the pets and from their own children, as children pick them up at school and bring them home.

There is certainly anecdotal evidence of the latter to be found in the “common wisdom” imparted to people becoming new kindergarten and elementary school teachers. When one woman started teaching in California, her school board warned her that she should probably plan her finances for the first year of teaching based on being out sick more than her allotted number of “sick days,” and thus not being paid for them. The woman, who had always been remarkably healthy, laughed at this advice, but then spent 25% of her first year at home sick, because of all the germs she picked up from kids in the classroom.

However, this same schoolteacher rarely ever got sick again. Her exposure to a wide variety of germs transmitted by the kids did seem to boost her immune system over time, and enhanced her ability to be exposed to them in the future without getting sick herself. We can possibly infer that the same thing happens with small children in the home—they pick up germs at school and bring them home where the parents are exposed to them. This exposure then buildsimmunity over time rather than diminishing it. Dr. Jordan S. Orange, chief of immunology, allergy and rheumatology at Texas Children’s Hospital explains the simple mechanics of this “early exposure” process this way: “When you get it [immunity], you have it. So, if you get it earlier, you’re going to be immune earlier.”

Related studies have indicated that many people feel happier when they have kids. If this is actually true, then their positive mental state can also certainly contribute to staying healthy. Besides, as all parents know, there are so many other joys associated with having kids that even if there aren’t a huge number of studies proving that they keep parents healthier, they’ll feel healthier.

Drink Your Vegetables! Guide to the Best Vegetable Juice Options

Drink Your Vegetables! Guide to the Best Vegetable Juice Options

Experts recommend that we get 9 servings of fruit and vegetables each day in order to stay healthy and reduce our likelihood of a wide range of diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, stroke and cancer. An evaluation of long-term studies conducted in Europe and the US found that those who ate more than 5 servings of fruit and vegetables daily had a 20 percent lower risk of stroke and coronary heart disease than those who ate fewer than 3 servings per day.

Although fruit is very healthy (it provides lots of vitamins and fiber), it contains a lot of sugar in the form of fructose. This is why experts say that about three-fifths of those 9 servings of fruit and vegetables should be comprised of vegetables. But it’s not easy for a lot of people to get those all-important servings each day, given our increasingly busy schedules. Luckily, it’s relatively simple to get your daily veggies from drinking juice.

Just to be crystal clear on this point—it is generally better for you to eat whole vegetables either raw or very lightly cooked as often as possible. Vegetable juices are generally pretty low in fiber, depending on the juice (or juicer) you get. Fiber is important for digestive health, reducing the risk of constipation and keeping your cholesterol at a healthy level. Nevertheless, drinking vegetable juice is far better than getting little or no vegetables at all!

Juicing can be a particularly useful option for people who have digestive issues. To get the most nutritional value from your vegetables (or from any other food you eat, for that matter), your body must first break them down during digestion. Generally speaking, the simple act of chewing and swallowing our food so that it can be dissolved elsewhere along the digestive tract should be sufficient to release the nutrients in whatever we eat. However, some people (including the elderly, whose digestive enzymes may not be as powerful as they once were) have digestive problems that interfere with the absorption of nutrients. Since juice has had most of the vegetables’ cellulose removed or broken down, it’s easier for the digestive system to absorb all those important nutrients.

For veggie juices with the highest nutritional content, consider juices featuring some of the following vegetables:

  • Tomatoes – Possibly the best vegetable to juice, tomatoes contain lycopene, which has been shown to lower the risk of prostate cancer and is supportive of heart health.
  • Kale – Chock full of vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B, C and K, calcium, copper and magnesium, kale also is high in cancer-fighting phytonutrients.
  • Cabbage – Helps protect against ulcers, and its indoles help to regulate metabolism and the balance of estrogen.
  • Peppers – Red bell peppers in particular are high in vitamin C and antioxidants. Adds a refreshing flavor to any vegetable juice.
  • Celery – High in potassium, celery helps to regulate blood pressure. It also reduces uric acid in the blood, which is good news for anyone with gout.
  • Spinach – High in the cancer-fighting antioxidant lutein, spinach is also high in vitamins A, C and E, and is a good source of calcium, folic acid, iron and potassium.
  • Carrots – These contain large amounts of beta carotene, good for the skin, eyes, brain and arteries. They blend well with other vegetables as well. Just be sure to use them somewhat sparingly, as they are also quite high in sugar.
  • Parsley – Cleanses the liver and kidneys and is supportive of heart health. It is also high in vitamin C.

So drink up, and enjoy the health benefits you can gain from these wonderful vegetables!

  • Special Note: Using a high-powered blender such as a Blendtec or Vitamix Blender allows you to get your juice and fiber as well! Not everyone can afford one but for those that can, it can be a wonderful investment!

 

Pumpkin Muffins

Pumpkin Muffins

Pumpkin Muffins

Category: Baked Goods

Yield: 12 muffins

Pumpkin Muffins

Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 cup quick rolled oats, ground into flour (use blender)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 Tablespoons protein powder
  • 1 cup pumpkin, canned

Instructions

  1. Combine, honey, butter eggs and pumpkin in a large bowl. In a separate bowl combine dry ingredients and mix well. Add dry ingredients to pumpkin mixture and blend together. Be careful not to over mix. Pour into muffin pans, which have been sprayed with a nonstick spray. Bake at 375 degrees for approximately 30 minutes.

Notes

Today's recipe is shared from the book Real Food, Real Fast by Rico Caveglia

http://chiroaddict.com/pumpkin-muffins/

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