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Chiropractic Effective for Cervicogenic Headache

Chiropractic Effective for Cervicogenic Headache

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), headache pain is “extremely common,” with headache disorders—which are characterized as head pain that is repeated in nature—afflicting as many as one in 20 individuals on a daily or almost-daily basis. An additional one in seven people deal with the king of all headaches: migraines.

Another type of headache which can create an amazing amount of throbbing discomfort is a cervicogenic headache. Defined by the American Migraine Foundation as a “secondary headache” whose cause originates somewhere in the neck area even though it presents itself in the head, some research studies have found that these particular headaches tend to respond rather well to chiropractic treatment sessions.

For instance, BMC Research Notes published the results of a single-blinded randomized control trial conducted in Norway which involved 19 individuals between the ages of 18 and 70 who suffered from cervicogenic headaches. Each subject was assigned to one of three groups for a length of 17 months. The first group received actual chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy utilizing the Gonstead Method. The second group received sham chiropractic manipulations, and the third group served as a control and was simply asked to continue with their current treatment regimen, which did not include any type of manual intervention whatsoever.

Upon conclusion of the study, only 12 of the original 19 participants remained, due to either drop outs or the subject being excluded once randomization occurred. However, of these remaining individuals, those assigned to receive actual spinal manipulation reported a reduction in the number of headaches experienced both during the treatment regimen and at follow-ups conducted six months and one year post-treatment. This was particularly notable when compared to individuals assigned to the control group who reported no change in their cervicogenic headache frequency during or post-study.

While this is a rather small sample size, highlighting the need for more research to be conducted in this area, the study’s findings suggest that, for patients struggling with cervicogenic headaches, chiropractic treatment is definitely better than no treatment at all. This is true both short and long term as positive effects are likely to remain long after the sessions have ceased.

Additionally, although headache pain is among one of the most common pains experienced by adults worldwide, that doesn’t mean that people must simply manage their way through it. By engaging in regular chiropractic care, some headaches can be effectively treated at the source. Cervicogenic headaches are one of them, making this treatment method beneficial for patients seeking a reduction in head pain, and an increase in life satisfaction.

  • Cervicogenic Headache. (October 24, 2016). American Migraine Foundation.

  • Chaibi A, Knackstedt H, Tuchin PJ, Russell MB. Chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for cervicogenic headache: a single-blinded, placebo, randomized controlled trial. BMC Research Notes 2017;10:310.doi:10.1186/s13104-017-2651-4

Today’s article was written by Michael Melton and is shared from the following website: https://www.chironexus.net/2018/03/chiropractic-effective-cervicogenic-headache/

Chronic Headache Linked to Anxiety, Depression

Chronic Headache Linked to Anxiety, Depression

Tension and cervicogenic headaches are clinically similar, but they are associated with varying personality traits. A recent study evaluated the personality differences between chronic headache sufferers to determine the traits most closely linked to each type of headache.

The researchers administered personality questionnaires to the participants and measured their depressive trends with the Plutchik-van-Praag Depression Inventory. The study involved 26 healthy men, 18 suffering from chronic tension-type headaches, and 19 with cervicogenic headaches.

Compared with healthy participants, those with chronic tension headaches scored significantly higher for Neuroticism-Anxiety and on the PVP depression test. People with a high Neuroticism-Anxiety score are described as tense, worried, fearful, and sensitive to criticism. Meanwhile, the cervicogenic headache group scored significantly lower for Thrill and Adventure Seeking traits. This measurement of sensation-seeking represents the willingness to take risks for excitement, indicating that patients with cervicogenic headaches have less desire to engage in activities involving speed or danger.

These results indicate that higher scores for depression and  neuroticism-anxiety are linked with chronic tension-type headaches, while lower sensation-seeking scores are linked with cervicogenic headaches. However, it has not yet been established whether these abnormal traits are the causes or consequences of headaches.

These findings may encourage the use of psychotherapy for patients with headaches. In addition to undergoing chiropractic treatments, managing anxiety and depression could be an important component of headache relief.

Reference

Chen W, Yu S, et al. Personality Characteristics of Male Sufferers of Chronic Tension-Type and Cervicogenic Headache. Journal of Clinical Neurology 2012; 8(1):69-74.

Shared from the following website: https://www.chironexus.net/2012/09/chronic-headache-linked-to-anexity-depression/

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