A Healthy Pumpkin Pie Recipe!

A Healthy Pumpkin Pie Recipe!

Pumpkin Pie

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes

Category: Desserts

Cuisine: American

Yield: One 9' pie

Ingredients

  • For the pastry:
  • 1½ cups whole grain einkorn flour, whole wheat pastry flour, or other whole grain, finely milled flour of your choice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 oz. (6 tablespoons) butter, cut into ½-inch squares and frozen
  • 2½ oz. (5 tablespoons) lard, cut into ½-inch squares and frozen (or replace with more butter if you prefer an all butter crust)
  • 2 tablespoons ice water
  • For the pumpkin custard:
  • 2 cups pumpkin puree (follow instructions for roasting pumpkin below, or use canned 100 percent pumpkin puree)
  • 1¼ cups heavy cream or coconut milk
  • 2–8 tablespoons maple syrup (sweeten to taste)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ⅛ teaspoon allspice
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • If roasting pumpkin: Cut baby pumpkin in half. Scoop out seeds and bake at 375°F until soft, about 30–60 minutes, depending on size. Let cool, then scoop out flesh and mash before proceeding with recipe.

Instructions

  1. Prepare pastry: Place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor (or bowl, if making by hand). Add chopped, frozen butter and lard to flour and pulse to combine (or incorporate with cold hands or a pastry blender), until mixture resembles large peas. Add water a little at a time until pastry just starts to come together in a ball. Dump onto counter and shape into a ball, then flatten into a disk about ½-inch thick. Wrap pastry. Allow to rest and chill in refrigerator for at least 45 minutes before using.
  2. Prepare crust: Dust countertop with a little flour and roll out pastry to fit a 9-inch deep dish pie pan. Fit pastry into pie pan and trim edges, then crimp to form a border. Set aside in fridge to chill while you finish the custard. (You can save the trimmings to make decorative leaves or other garnishes if you like.)
  3. Prepare custard: Place pumpkin, cream or coconut milk, maple syrup (start lower, you can always add more to taste), salt, and spices in a blender. Blend until completely smooth, about 1 minute. Taste for sweetness and adjust as necessary. Once sweetened to your liking, add eggs and egg yolk and blend until smooth.
  4. Bake pie: Preheat oven to 350°F. Pour pumpkin custard into prepared pie shell and place in center rack of oven. Bake until pie is just set, with a slight jiggle in the center, about 45 minutes to an hour. Remove from oven and let cool on rack to at least room temperature before serving. Slice or refrigerate until ready to serve.

Notes

Recipe notes: All in all, pumpkin pie isn’t really difficult to make, but I’ve found a couple of secrets that ensure success:

Use roasted pumpkin flesh from baby pie pumpkins. In my experience, taking the time to roast the pumpkin yourself results in a deeper flavor and superior texture. Canned, 100 percent pumpkin puree works in a pinch, but make sure you don’t accidentally get pumpkin pie puree, which contains added sugars.

Make the custard in a blender. I find that incorporating the extra air into the custard gives it a more silken mouth-feel.

Bake the pie until just set. This results in a dense, creamy texture and limits the chance for cracks. (But if it does crack, not to worry, it’ll still taste great!)

http://chiroaddict.com/a-healthy-pumpkin-pie-recipe/

Fitness Lessons from the Dance Studio

Fitness Lessons from the Dance Studio

Tuniertänzer

 For those who want to get fit, but find the thought of working out at a gym about as appealing as a root canal, dancing may be the answer. Dancing is a fun way to get off the couch and exercise without it actually feeling like work (most of the time, anyway). People who dance regularly point out that it can help you manage your weight, maintain your flexibility and improve your coordination.  Plus it’s a social activity, so you can make new friends or enjoy old ones while you’re at it! 

The TV show “Dancing with the Stars has contributed to a sort of popular renaissance for ballroom dancing in the U.S. Dance classes teaching tango, foxtrot and salsa are quick to fill up, and the demand is growing. But did you know that, entertainment value aside, dancing may also have more health benefits—physically and mentally—than most people realize? 

Dancing has been found to boost memory and help reduce your risk of dementia as you age, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The part of the brain responsible for memory, the hippocampus, normally shrinks as we grow older. Those who dance show greater volume in the hippocampus. Of 11 physical activities included in the study, only dancing reduced dementia risk. 

According to Dr. Joe Verghese, a professor at New York’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine, “Dance, in many ways, is a complex activity. It’s not just purely physical.” Although the exercise itself increases blood flow to the brain, dancing also involves having to memorize steps, anticipate your partner’s moves, and is a very social form of exercise. 

Dancing can also relieve stress and reduce depression. The social contact that happens during dance lessons and at dance events allows you to meet new people who can become part of your support network. It has been shown to increase energy levels as well. 

Dancing is a great way to get cardiovascular exercise, and it may provide even greater benefits than the cardio you get at the gym. An Italian study found that the patients with cardiovascular disease who started waltzing on a regular basis had healthier hearts, better breathing, and a more improved quality of life than patients who walked on a treadmill or biked for exercise. 

Those interested in losing weight can also look to dancing. A study in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology found that people who enrolled in a dance training program lost as much weight and increased their aerobic power as much as those who practiced biking or jogging. 

Tango, which is enjoying one of the largest resurgences in ballroom dancing, can help improve your balance. Tango requires dancers to have good posture and balance while quickly executing complicated movements that often require rapid changes in direction. 

Don’t worry if you feel you have two left feet. Most people can significantly improve their dancing ability with just a little practice. And it’s important not to be too critical of yourself. There are a lot of beginners out there, many of whom feel unsure about their dancing. Just relax and have fun with it, and you will find the improvement in your fitness a nice side benefit! 

 

Here’s a Soup Recipe to Warm Up a Chilly Day!

Here’s a Soup Recipe to Warm Up a Chilly Day!

SKINNY SLOW COOKER POTATO SOUP

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 6 hours

Total Time: 6 hours, 15 minutes

Category: Soups

Cuisine: American

Yield: 6 - 8

Ingredients

  • 6 - 8 slices cooked turkey bacon, diced
  • 2 lbs Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and diced into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 yellow onion, peeled and diced
  • 4 cups reduced sodium chicken stock
  • 12 oz can low fat evaporated milk
  • 2 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 4 oz reduced fat cream cheese, softened
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • pinch ground celery seed
  • sliced green onions or chives, for garnish
  • additional shredded cheese, for garnish
  • additional bacon, for garnish

Instructions

  1. 1. To a 4 quart or larger slow cooker, add bacon, potatoes, onion and chicken stock and stir to combine. Cover and cook on LOW for 6-8 hours, or HIGH for 3-4 hours, until potatoes are very tender.
  2. 2. Combine evaporated milk and cornstarch, whisking to combine until no lumps remain. The last 30 minutes of cooking, add cream cheese, cornstarch/milk mixture, shredded cheddar, salt, pepper and celery seed. Stir to combine, cover and continue cooking 30 minutes.
  3. 3. Remove lid and mash about half of the potatoes with a potato masher to thicken the soup up even more.
  4. Serve garnished with any of the toppings. Leftovers can be refrigerated in an airtight container for 3-4 days.
  5. STOVETOP INSTRUCTIONS:
  6. 1. Add a slight drizzle of olive oil or butter to a dutch oven or large heavy bottomed pot. Add onions and cook 2-4 minutes. Add in diced bacon, diced potatoes and pour in chicken stock.
  7. 2. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a high simmer and cook for 15 minutes, or until potatoes are tender. Whisk cornstarch into evaporated milk until no lumps remain.
  8. 3. Add mixture to pot along with the cream cheese, shredded cheddar, salt, pepper, and celery seed. Stir to combine and simmer 5 minutes or so, until slightly thickened.
  9. Mash about half the potatoes with a potato masher, then serve with desired garnishes.
http://chiroaddict.com/heres-a-soup-recipe-to-warm-up-a-chilly-day/

Benefits of Zinc

Benefits of Zinc

Zinc is the second most common mineral in the human body (after iron) and is found in every one of our cells. It plays a vital role in many of the body’s functions, so ensuring that you get enough zinc in your diet is important. It is essential for helping the body to heal and for the maintenance of a healthy immune system. It is also important is supporting the senses (taste, sight, and smell), blood clotting and healthy thyroid function.

Zinc is one of the most important minerals for fertility and general reproductive health. It is necessary for proper levels of testosterone in men and the maintenance of a healthy libido. The mineral also plays a key role in the healthy development of sperm, and abundant levels of zinc have been shown to be protective of the prostate, reducing the risk of prostate cancer. The belief that oysters have aphrodisiac properties actually does have some basis in truth. Oysters have one of the highest concentrations of zinc of any food. In women it regulates estrogen and progesterone and supports the proper maturation of the egg in preparation for fertilization.

Ensuring you have an adequate level of zinc can help reduce your risk of insulin sensitivity, one of the precursors to diabetes. It supports T-cell function, which boosts the immune system when the body is under attack by bacteria and viruses.

Zinc deficiency is not common in the developed world, but those with anorexia, alcoholics, the elderly and anyone with a malabsorption syndrome such as celiac disease or Crohn’s disease is at higher risk. Zinc deficiency symptoms include frequent colds, poor wound healing, poor growth, loss of appetite, weight loss, dermatitis, psoriasis, hair loss, white spots on the nails, night blindness and depression.

Following is the recommended daily intake of zinc for different age groups:

Infants birth – 6 months: 2 mg/day

Infants 7 – 12 months: 3 mg/day

Children 1 – 3 years: 3 mg/day

Children 4 – 8 years: 5 mg/day

Children 9 – 13 years: 8 mg/day

Adolescent boys 14 – 18 years: 11 mg/day

Adolescent girls 14 – 18 years: 9 mg/day

Men 19 years and older: 11 mg/day

Women 19 years and older: 8 mg/day

Pregnant women 14 – 18 years: 12 mg/day

Pregnant women 19 years and older: 11 mg/day

Breastfeeding women 14 – 18 years: 13 mg/day

Breastfeeding women over 18 years: 12 mg/day

Children should never be given zinc supplements without first consulting with a pediatrician. If supplements are necessary, a copper supplement should be taken as well, as a high intake of zinc can deplete levels of copper.

You should be able to get adequate zinc from eating a healthy, balanced diet rich in whole foods. The body absorbs between 20% and 40% of the zinc present in food. The best sources of zinc are oysters, red meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, cheese, legumes (such as soybeans, black-eyed peas, and peanuts), cooked greens and seeds (such as pumpkin and sunflower).

 

Winter Fitness Tips for the Rest of Us

Winter Fitness Tips for the Rest of Us

Do you have family members, close friends or coworkers who just can’t wait for the winter weather to get here? Maybe they’re hardcore skiers or snowboarders. Maybe they’re ice skaters or hockey players. Or perhaps they’re all-season runners looking forward to a change of pace. Whatever they’re into, this article IS NOT FOR THEM. This article is for the rest of us.

One of the great challenges faced by many people who live in four-season climates is how to stay active and get enough exercise once the temperatures start dropping. When it’s cold and wet outside, few of us have the “Just Do It” mentality of Olympic marathoner Joan Benoit. She’s inspired a well-known Nike commercial that showcases her commitment. Joan (bless her) takes one look out the door of her Maine cottage at 5:25 in the morning, sees a raging snowstorm, and goes out for her morning run anyway. That’s why Joan is an Olympian.

But no matter how important we know it is to remain active during the cold months, most of us still need a little inspiration—and a plan. To help out, we’ve compiled a list of tips to help you get your winter exercise this season.

Outdoor Fitness Tips

  • Don’t let the cold weather keep you indoors. Bundle up, wear lots of layers, don’t forget your gloves and hat, stretch first, and then step out to enjoy the brisk air.
  • Remember your New Years’ Resolutions about exercise, and try to keep to them. Just a 10-15 minute walk every day before dinner can do wonders to keep you healthy and fit.
  • Buy yourself a pedometer and set a goal of walking 10,000 steps a day. If you’ve got a dog, his or her walks are great opportunities to add to your daily total.
  • Go for walks in the snow, or just go outside and rake leaves or do other work in the yard.
  • If you’re fit (check with your doctor first), rather than lamenting that accumulation of snow, go out and shovel some of it. It’s one of the best forms of exercise you can get provided that you use proper form and take the right precautions.
  • If you’re normally athletic and in good shape, consider learning a new winter sport such as skiing or snowboarding.
  • If you’re more sedentary, consider lower-impact sports such as snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, tobogganing, or skating.
  • Plan your social activities around your exercise plan, and allow your friends and family to get in on the fun—and the exercise—too.

Indoor Fitness Tips

  • Remember the benefits of exercising at home. Consider buying a treadmill or exercise bicycle and some hand weights or stretch bands and exercise in front of your TV instead of being a couch potato.
  • If you’re not really an exercise-at-home kind of person, consider joining a gym. They often have special membership prices at this time of year, and most of them also offer courses in things like yoga, martial arts or aerobics.
  • At work or on the way there, take the stairs rather than the elevator or escalator.
  • Turn your housework into an exercise program, staying active by dancing your way through the vacuuming, mopping, and window washing. It’s more exercise than you think, and it has the extra benefit of keeping your house clean.
  • If it’s really too cold to be outside, go to the mall and do some “mall-walking,” getting your exercise and your shopping taken care of at the same time.

Remember—every season offers its own unique opportunities to get healthy and stay fit. During the winter months, all it takes is a little creativity and a willingness to adapt. The change of pace can do you good!

If you haven’t been physically active in a while and you’re kick-starting a new fitness routine, we encourage you to check with your doctor first. This is particularly true if you have known health conditions or are prone to injury. We can be a great resource when it comes to designing structured exercise programs that help you meet your goals. Call or visit our office today!

Delicious but Healthy!

Delicious but Healthy!

Lettuce Wraps

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 25 minutes

Category: Main Dish

Cuisine: Asian

Yield: 4 Servings

Today's recipe is a copykat recipe for PF Chang's Lettuce Wrap. It was developed by Sabrina and is shared from the following website: https://dinnerthendessert.com/p-f-changs-chicken-lettuce-wraps/

Ingredients

  • DIPPING SAUCE
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1/8 teaspoon chili oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chives
  • 1/4 teaspoon Chinese hot mustard
  • 1 teaspoon Sriracha
  • MAIN INGREDIENTS
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • 1 8- ounce can water chestnuts drained and minced
  • 1 6- ounce can straw mushrooms drained and minced
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 2 scallion stalks chopped
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons mirin
  • 2 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar

Instructions

  1. Note: click on times in the instructions to start a kitchen timer while cooking.
  2. To make the dipping sauce, add the ingredients (from the sugar to the sriracha) in a small bowl and whisk until fully combined.
  3. In a large skillet add two tablespoons of oil and brown the chicken in it on medium-high heat.
  4. When browned remove chicken, add in the rest of the oil and sauté the water chestnuts, straw mushrooms, garlic and scallions for 3-5 minutes.
  5. Add the chicken back into the skillet along with the soy sauce, mirin, oyster sauce and rice vinegar and stir to coat and combine everything.
  6. Serve in lettuce cups and top or dip into the dipping sauce as desired.
  7. If you'd like to serve these as they are in the restaurant you can purchase and fry up maifun rice sticks, but to keep it easy I skipped that step since it is mostly a garnish.
http://chiroaddict.com/delicious-but-healthy/

Here’s a Grab and Go Breakfast Idea or Snack!

Here’s a Grab and Go Breakfast Idea or Snack!

Apple & Carrot "Superhero" Muffins

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Yield: 12

Ingredients

  • 2 cups packed almond meal or almond flour (10 ounces)
  • 1 1/2 cups old-fashioned oats (certified gluten free if necessary)
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • Optional mix-ins: 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (I used pecans), or raisins or chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 3 eggs
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 cup grated Granny Smith apple (about 1 1/2 apples)
  • 1 cup peeled and grated carrots (about 3 carrots)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a 12-cup standard muffin tin with paper muffin cups (I didn’t because I have full faith in my muffin pan, but use them if you’re uncertain).
  2. In a large bowl, combine the almond meal, oats, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and optional mix-ins, if using.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the honey, eggs and butter. Whisk in the grated apple and carrots. Pour the mixture into the dry ingredients, mixing until just combined.
  4. Spoon the batter into the muffin cups, filling each to the brim. Bake until the muffins are nicely browned on top and a knife inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean, 25 to 30 minutes. Allow muffins to cool completely before storing.
  5. Store leftover muffins in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer. If you like them warm, reheat them on low power in the microwave.

Notes

Recipe from the Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow. cookbook by Shalane Flanagan and Elyse Kopecky. This recipe was shared from the following website: https://cookieandkate.com/2018/apple-carrot-muffins-recipe/print/31395/

http://chiroaddict.com/heres-a-grab-and-go-breakfast-idea-or-snack/

Why Coconut Oil is a Healthy Fat

Why Coconut Oil is a Healthy Fat

Information

Coconut oil has saturated fat, and we’ve been lead to believe that saturated fats are bad. But Dr. Bruce Fife explains the difference in the saturated fat found in coconut oil. He discusses how those fats are healthy for the body and how other saturated fats found in meats for example, are not as healthy.

An Easy Peasy Make-A-Head Breakfast Recipe!

An Easy Peasy Make-A-Head Breakfast Recipe!

Sleep On It Oatmeal

Yield: 3 - 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Oat Groats
  • 3 cups water
  • Pinch of salt
  • Topping of choice

Instructions

  1. 1. Spray the inside or line the slow cooker
  2. 2. Add oats, water and salt to slow cooker.
  3. 3. Set to low and cook overnight
  4. 4. Add toppings. Enjoy

Notes

This recipe has been shared from www.organicsbylee.com

http://chiroaddict.com/an-easy-peasy-make-a-head-breakfast-recipe/

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