An Easy Peasy Make-A-Head Breakfast Recipe!

An Easy Peasy Make-A-Head Breakfast Recipe!

Sleep On It Oatmeal

Yield: 3 - 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Oat Groats
  • 3 cups water
  • Pinch of salt
  • Topping of choice

Instructions

  1. 1. Spray the inside or line the slow cooker
  2. 2. Add oats, water and salt to slow cooker.
  3. 3. Set to low and cook overnight
  4. 4. Add toppings. Enjoy

Notes

This recipe has been shared from www.organicsbylee.com

http://chiroaddict.com/an-easy-peasy-make-a-head-breakfast-recipe/

What Everyone Should Know About Heavy Metal Poisoning

What Everyone Should Know About Heavy Metal Poisoning

Even if you do not spend a lot of time in an industrial manufacturing environment, there is a chance that you may be exposed to heavy metals on a regular basis. Although it is not a common problem, you could be at risk of heavy metal poisoning (sometimes referred to as heavy metal toxicity) from such things as eating lots of large fish, getting some types of immunizations and painting your bedroom.  

There are 35 metals that are considered toxic to us, though only 23 of them are actually categorized as “heavy metals”. Of these, the 15 most common (and therefore the ones to be most concerned about) are arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, thalium and zinc. Some of these (such as copper, iron, manganese and zinc) are metals that our bodies require in trace amounts in order for us to maintain good health. However, an overabundance of any of these metals can lead to serious health problems such as reduced function of the brain and central nervous system, alteration to the structure of the blood and major organ damage. 

The problem lies in the fact that the body cannot metabolize heavy metals easily, so they bioaccumulate in the soft tissues. Arsenic, lead and mercury are the most frequent sources of heavy metal toxicity.  

Symptoms of heavy metal toxicity include chronic pain, general discomfort and fatigue, brain fog, chronic infections, food allergies, gastrointestinal problems, dizziness, headaches and/or migraines, mood swings, depression, anxiety, and feelings of numbness, tingling and burning in the extremities. 

If you have many of the above symptoms, there are a few tests you can take to determine if you have heavy metal poisoning. Tests that can determine the presence of heavy metals in your body include a blood test, urine test, x-rays, fecal analysis and a hair and fingernail analysis.  

Conventional treatment for heavy metal poisoning usually involves some form of chelation therapy that uses a chelating agent to remove heavy metals from the body. During chelation (from the Greek word meaning “claw”), the chelating agent binds to the heavy metals in the body so they can be excreted. 

Following are some tips on how to reduce your risk of heavy metal poisoning: 

  • Eat large fish such as tuna sparingly. Fish at the top of the food chain bioaccumulate heavy metals such as mercury, which is why scientists and nutrition experts advise that you eat fish only twice a week. If you want to get more oily fish in your diet, stick with small fish such as sardines, which are low in heavy metals.
     
  • Have any mercury fillings removed from your teeth. Ask for glass ionomer or composite (resin) fillings, which are not only better for your overall health, but are comparable in price and better for the long-term health of your teeth. If your dentist insists on using mercury fillings, change dentists.
     
  • Ban smoking from your house. Not only can second-hand smoke affect your health and the health of your family (particularly your children), but so can “third-hand” smoke.  Studies have found that even those who smoke outside still carry the residues of tobacco smoke on their clothing and in their hair (which is why you can always tell who is a smoker when in an elevator with them). These residues include arsenic, lead, polonium and other carcinogens.
     
  • Eat organic food as much as possible. Conventional agriculture uses a lot of heavy metals in food production, from fertilizers and insecticides to storage.
     
  • Ceramic dishware from some foreign countries can contain heavy metals such as lead and cadmium in their paint. Check to ensure your dishware is free of these substances.
Taco Soup Makes a Healthy Fall Dinner Choice!

Taco Soup Makes a Healthy Fall Dinner Choice!

Taco Soup

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Category: Soups

Yield: 10 Servings

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons canola oil (or olive oil)
  • 1 large onion (sliced or diced)
  • 1 1⁄2 lbs ground beef (I prefer lean)
  • 1 (28 ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 1 (15 ounce) can tomato sauce
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 (35 g) envelope taco seasoning mix (regular or spicy, your call)
  • 4 large carrots, peeled and sliced into coins
  • 1 -2 cup frozen corn (more is better)
  • 1 (19 ounce) can black beans (rinsed and drained) or 1 (19 ounce) can beans, of your choice (rinsed and drained)

Instructions

  1. Heat oil over medium heat in a large soup pot and saute onion a couple minutes.
  2. Add beef and brown.
  3. Drain fat off the onions and beef and return to the pot.
  4. Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, water, seasoning and carrots. Simmer for at least 45 minutes, reducing heat to low.
  5. Add corn and beans and simmer 15 minutes. Taste for salt and pepper.

Notes

This recipe is by Cookin-jo and is shared from the following website: https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/healthy-taco-soup-148168

http://chiroaddict.com/taco-soup-makes-a-healthy-fall-dinner-choice/

Easy Guacamole Recipe for a Healthy Snack!

Easy Guacamole Recipe for a Healthy Snack!

Easy Guacamole

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Category: Snacks

Yield: 6

Ingredients

  • 3 Haas avocados, halved, seeded and peeled
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/2 medium onion, diced
  • 1/2 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced
  • 2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl place the scooped avocado pulp and lime juice, toss to coat. Drain, and reserve the lime juice, after all of the avocados have been coated. Using a potato masher add the salt, cumin, and cayenne and mash. Then, fold in the onions, tomatoes, cilantro, and garlic. Add 1 tablespoon of the reserved lime juice. Let sit at room temperature for 1 hour and then serve.

Notes

Today's recipe was created by Alton Brown of the Food Network and is shared from the following website: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/guacamole-recipe-1940609

http://chiroaddict.com/easy-guacamole-recipe-for-a-healthy-snack/

Raking Leaves and a Pain-Free Fall

Raking Leaves and a Pain-Free Fall

With summer becoming a distant memory, the leaves will soon be turning colors and falling from the trees, blowing about your yard, driveway and sidewalk. So it’s only natural that your thoughts are turning to the day you’ll need to get the rake out and start to work. However—as with all maintenance and household tasks that require some physical exertion—it‘s very important for you to take a few common-sense precautions against accident and injury.

Fall yard work, leaf raking and other outdoor activities carry numerous risks, including upper and lower back strain, neck strain, and shoulder pain. Just like sports, this type of physical activity can increase your chances of getting hurt if your body isn’t properly prepared for it. You can avoid these types of injuries by warming up, stretching and maintaining good posture as you go about your work.

Athletes are able to reduce the risk of injury by warming up and stretching. You can use this approach too. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) recommends 10-15 minutes of stretching exercises such as trunk rotations, side-bends and knee-to-chest pulls. When these are combined with a short walk or some jumping jacks (which help to stimulate circulation) and followed by additional stretches, the body is ready for the sort of manual labor associated with raking and yard work.

While raking your yard, good posture can also prevent back problems—make sure you keep your back straight and your head up! Use common sense while working: lift with your legs and bend with your knees, taking care that you don’t strain your back while picking up bundles of leaves and grass. If you’re likely to carry heavy items, hold them close to your body to help prevent back strain. In order to take the pressure off your back, rake using the “scissors” stance: put your right foot forward and the left one back, then reverse after a few minutes. When using a lawn mower, try to use your core body weight to move it as opposed to your arms and back.

Also, remember that it’s important to pace yourself and take frequent breaks. This is particularly important when the weather is hot. If this is the case, also be sure to drink lots of water and wear sun-protection such as a hat, sunblock and sunglasses. Switching tasks regularly can help prevent repetitive motion injuries in vulnerable muscle groups—change body positions, or simply move onto another job for a short period of time before returning to the previous one.

Investing in extra protective gear (maybe some gloves to prevent blisters, a mask if you’re prone to allergies and protective eyewear) can make life easier while taking on outdoor chores. Ergonomic tools with extra padding, larger or curved handles are less tiring to use over a long time period.

One of the most useful things you can do to help prevent accidents and injuries is to have a plan for what you want to accomplish and to make sure that you have realistic expectations about how much you can get done in the time available. If you’re unaccustomed to physical labor, chances are pretty good that you’ll feel a bit stiff or possibly sore the next day. If this happens, you can use ice to soothe the discomfort. Of course, chiropractic care is always available if you need it.

As chiropractic physicians, we’re experts in diagnosing and treating a wide variety of conditions that affect the musculoskeletal and nervous system. We know from experience how easy it is for fall clean-up to unexpectedly go wrong. Please be smart and take reasonable precautions!

Healthy Snack for the Kids…Wonderful and Easy Recipe!

Healthy Snack for the Kids…Wonderful and Easy Recipe!

Honey Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Yield: 1 Loaf

This recipe has been shared from the following website: https://cookieandkate.com/2011/whole-wheat-pumpkin-bread/print/23199/

Ingredients

  • ⅓ cup melted coconut oil or extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup pumpkin purée
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon, plus more to swirl on top
  • ½ teaspoon ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon allspice or cloves
  • 1 ¾ cups whole wheat pastry flour or regular whole wheat flour
  • Optional- ⅓ to ½ cup rinsed millet
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda*
  • ¼ cup hot water*
  • Optional- turbinado (raw) sugar for sprinkling on top

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit (165 degrees Celsius) and grease a 9×5 inch loaf pan.
  2. In a large bowl, beat oil and honey together. Add eggs, and beat well.
  3. Stir in pumpkin purée and vanilla, then the salt, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and allspice. Stir in flour, just until combined. If you’re adding millet, stir that in as well.
  4. Add baking soda to hot water, stir to mix, and then mix briefly into batter until it is evenly distributed. Spread batter into the greased loaf pan.
  5. Sprinkle with cinnamon, and swirl with the tip of a table knife for a pretty marbled effect. Sprinkle a big pinch of turbinado sugar on top for a light, sweet crunch.
  6. Bake for 55 to 65 minutes. Be sure to check that the bread is done baking by inserting a toothpick in the top. It should come out clean. If the top of the bread jiggles when you pull it out of the oven, it’s NOT done! Let the bread cool in the loaf pan for 5 minutes, then transfer it to a wire rack to cool for 30 minutes before slicing.
http://chiroaddict.com/healthy-snack-for-the-kids-wonderful-and-easy-recipe/

Chiropractic Treatments for Whiplash

Chiropractic Treatments for Whiplash

.Because each individual case of whiplash is different, it is not possible to generalize about the chiropractic whiplash treatment.

The appropriate chiropractic treatment is unique to each whiplash injury and is directed at the primary dysfunctions detected during the chiropractic exam.

However, chiropractors commonly employ different chiropractic treatments for whiplash, often including:

  • Manipulation
  • Muscle relaxation and/or stimulation
  • Various exercises
  • Ergonomic and lifestyle changes.

This article explains when, why and how chiropractors may employ these whiplash treatments for neck pain, shoulder pain, back pain, and other related symptoms.

Chiropractic Manipulation for Whiplash

The primary whiplash treatment for joint dysfunction, spinal manipulation involves the chiropractor gently moving the involved joint into the direction in which it is restricted.

Also known as a chiropractic adjustment, spinal manipulation may involve the application of a short thrust in that direction. In many cases, instead of a thrust, a slow mobilizing movement is used by the chiropractor.

Muscle Relaxation or Stimulation as Whiplash Treatments

The chiropractor’s primary whiplash treatment for related muscle dysfunction, muscle relaxation and/or stimulation consist of gentle stretches to the muscle that has excessive tension or repeated contractions of the muscle that is inhibited.

If the muscle is very tight, a more vigorous stretch may be applied by the chiropractor. Gentle finger pressure techniques may be applied to trigger points to relieve the pain associated with the tight muscles.

McKenzie Exercises and Stabilization/Sensorimotor Activities

Chiropractors may employ different types of exercises, including McKenzie exercises and/or stabilization and sensorimotor exercises, to help treat patients with whiplash injuries.

McKenzie exercises are specifically designed to reduce disc derangement related to a whiplash injury. They consist of simple movements that are initially done in the office but make for an easy transition to self-care at home. McKenzie exercises also help the patient take an active role in his or her own recovery.

Stabilization and sensorimotor exercise approaches are designed to correct faulty movement patterns in routine activities and everyday life. Such whiplash treatment trains the nervous system to better coordinate and control movement patterns and improves the ability of the neck muscles to maintain stability of the neck.

These exercises are designed to help in a major trauma, such as a fall or whiplash during a motor vehicle accident, or in “microtrauma” from simple things such as being jostled in a crowd, playing sports or performing occupational or home jobs that require physical effort.

Chiropractic Advice on Ergonomic and Lifestyle Changes

These whiplash treatment suggestions stress improvements for performing everyday activities with minimal strain to the body. The chiropractic advice addresses factors in an individual’s work, home or recreational activities that perpetuate the dysfunctions that result from the whiplash accident.

Additionally, spine care professionals at the chiropractic clinic may teach the patient better “use of self” and, if necessary, stress reduction methods to help chiropractic problems.

Whiplash Treatment in Chiropractic Care

The whiplash treatment plan developed by the chiropractor for each specific problem may include one or more of these approaches and may involve others as well.

In addition to his or her whiplash treatment plan, the doctor of chiropractic might give a referral to another health professional, such as a medical specialist if it is deemed appropriate.

Today’s article was written by Donald Murphy, DC and is shared from the following website: https://www.spine-health.com/treatment/chiropractic/chiropractic-treatments-whiplash. Today’s image was shared from the following website: https://seriousaccidents.com/personal-injury/whiplash-injuries/

Teens, Back Pain and Chiropractic Care

Teens, Back Pain and Chiropractic Care

Looking at the big picture, low back pain is a big problem. The condition affects more than 600 million people worldwide, including over one-third of all Americans—more than the number of people affected by diabetes, heart disease, and cancer combined. The financial burden (medical care plus lost productivity) caused by chronic lower back pain in America exceeds $550 billion annually.

That said, one of the saddest aspects of chronic lower back pain is that it doesn’t discriminate between adults and children. And in an era when teens’ musculoskeletal systems are particularly at risk because of reduced physical activity and poor posture (thanks to heavy school backpacks, improper sitting ergonomics and lots of time spent on mobile devices), this problem is only growing larger. In addition, a number of studies have already indicated that lower back pain in adolescents is strongly associated with the development of chronic lower back pain later in life. That’s the bad news for teens. However, the good news is that those adolescents who have been successfully treated to eliminate lower back pain in their youth have a lower risk of developing chronic lower back pain as they grow older.

So it’s natural that the medical community is keenly interested in learning which treatments are most successful in terms of eliminating the lower back pain itself and in preventing it from recurring later in life. This interest led to a recent study. The aim of the study was to determine which of the commonly-available treatment methodologies were most effective. To determine this, researchers performed a meta-analysis of existing studies published in English, French, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese to measure which of the treatments used in these studies produced the most consistently positive outcomes in terms of pain, disability, flexibility, endurance, and mental health. The researchers found studies that produced data for 11 treatment groups and 5 control groups involving a total of 334 children and adolescents, and then compared the data.

Their findings were both strong and definitive. Of all the treatment methodologies used in the individual studies, the ones most effective in producing short-term and long-term positive outcomes in the five areas studied were those that involved therapeutic physical conditioning and manual therapy. That is, treatments provided by “hands on” practitioners such as chiropractors, osteopaths, and physical therapists.

These therapies, commonly involving joint and spinal manipulation and ultrasound treatment to reduce pain, were subjectively found to be more effective by the patients than other treatments. The patients’ subjective analysis was confirmed in most of the studies by clinician assessments. Naturally, these “manual therapy” treatment options were preferable in many other ways as well, because they avoided reliance on potentially addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin, epidural steroid injections, and surgery.

These findings confirm what Doctors of Chiropractic have observed in their own clinics. Over the years, we have seen many patients (of all ages) benefit from the manual therapies we use to provide relief for their lower back pain. So if you (or your children) experience lower back pain—whether occasional or chronic—contact your chiropractor and ask him or her to explain to you the treatment options available, and what they can do to relieve your symptoms and allow you to enjoy life free from pain once again.

A Healthy Rice Recipe to Start the Week!

A Healthy Rice Recipe to Start the Week!

Brown Rice with Mushrooms

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup long-grain brown rice
  • 2 cups sliced mushrooms
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onions with part of tops
  • salt to taste
  • black pepper to tasted

Instructions

  1. Heat the chicken stock and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a saucepan. Add the rice, bring to boil, cover, educe the heat, and cook 40 minutes or so. Meanwhile, heat the rest of the butter in a skillet. Saute' the mushrooms and green onions. Add the saute' to the rice pot, along with some salt and pepper, and cook for a few more minutes, until the rice is tender and the liquid has been absorbed. Server as a side dish to broiled chicken breast or other meal.

Notes

This recipe is shared from The Whole Grain Cookbook by A.D. Livingston.

http://chiroaddict.com/a-healthy-rice-recipe-to-start-the-week/

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